1. I’ve stated that because of their lack of patience and attention, millennials and then the children of millennials will turn local cricket into a 20-20 competition in the fullness of time. You’re a teacher and better placed than me, am I too pessimistic as a 50 over fuddy duddy?  

I think the cricket day is too long now. If a game plays its full 50 overs, it will mean a player is at the cricket from 11:30 til 20:00 (with shower) which is fine for the cricket obsessive with little other pressure from home or friends. (At this point I must fully acknowledge Lindsay’s patience and understanding and our privileged position as teachers with long summer holidays).

With at least 10 double header weekends with cup competitions and 5 being triple headers with T20, the time commitment for players, spouses and families during the summer months is extraordinary. It is little wonder that some teams find it difficult to put the same team on the field during double headed weekends and that some good league cricketers walk away from the game. Playing less (league restructure) and more competitive games (two divisions) is essential in the modern era. Would the games be much different if they were 45 or 40 overs per side? I tend to think not and you would possibly save at least an hour of match time.

As for T20 itself, it is quicker and given the weather a good spectacle. But it tends to be able to be dominated by pros or the star amateurs without allowing younger players to contribute or develop their skills. It has its place but I wouldn’t like to see it as the main part of the fixture list for that reason alone.

  1. Right Chris just a couple of questions left. You’ve scored 7 League hundreds and 99 fifties. Is there one of those centuries and one of those fifties that really stand out above the others?          

I think the hundred in the 2004 WC final would have to be the standout innings for so many reasons is the most memorable but winning that first piece of silverware after nearly 150 years was an incredible feeling and hitting the winning runs to bring up the hundred, unreal…..

As for memorable 50’s (quite appropriate) the two in a season against Alan Donald are a special memory but you can’t really beat home half centuries against Burnley that contribute to winning games. I have already previously mentioned one in 2005, but 2010 and 2012 are also special. I remember the 2010 innings because Joe has a photo of him and I walking off the ground after sealing a victory with an over to spare when we needed about 35 off three overs. But perhaps the most memorable was the 50 in the first innings in 2012 when we were around 30 for 6, we were batting against their pro Adnan Rasool on a turning track and I managed to survive for 30 or so overs before being able to push our score up to 140 with Ferg and Joe. I think we then managed to bowl them out for 80 with Frankie demolishing their top order.

  1. Lastly I’ll get you out of here on this. I think it would be unfair to rate and judge your fellow Lowerhouse amateurs and friends but I’d like you to name , in no particular order, the 5 best Lowerhouse pros you’ve played with, the 5 toughest pros you’ve played against and the 5 best amateurs from opposition Clubs.      

LHCC Pros – In chronological order

  1. Kirti Azad
  2. Martin Van Jaarsveld
  3. Ryan Harris
  4. Andrew Macdonald
  5. Francois Haasbroek

Opposition Pros – In no particular order

  1. Roger Harper
  2. Chris Harris
  3. Sean Young
  4. Shane Warne
  5. Alan Donald

The last two international star names being the criteria.

Didn’t play against Viv Richards or Steve Waugh.

Opposition Amateurs – all-rounders and bowlers in no order

  1. Jack Simpson WK/batsmen
  2. Dave Pearson WK/batsmen
  3. Steve Dearden
  4. Jon Fielding
  5. Dibber and Kes – Bowlers

I found it difficult to judge batsmen objectively (as I didn’t bowl enough to find them tough) and there were too many choices.

So I took the easy route and limited my selection to all-rounders & bowlers.